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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
? or--or religion--how--how can religion help to reinvigorate american democracy? or schools--what can the school--what role can schools play in--in trying to fix this problem? c-span: what is the status of religion? >> guest: religion is--as a whole, religious participation is down, as everything else is, in terms of social connections. down about, oh, 25 percent over the last--that is, take going to church, for example, is down by about 25 percent over the last 25, 30--30 years. but, obviously, there are some parts of the religious spectrum that have had ena--enormous growth during this period. and there are others that have had substantial falls. i mean, the mainline protestant churches, for example, and--and--and--and attendance at mass among catholics, has dropped off a lot. but that's t--partially offset by the growth and participation in evangelical communities. and what we were talking about in the saguaro seminar was, well, ok, su--suppose we were to have a--another one of these what people call great awakenings, which we've had periodically in american history, where people b
as the religion of the land. so this was a big occasion, the 10th anniversary. all the bishops were summoned and mussolini's own representatives would be there, the king's son would be there, the world would be watching. it was a speech that the the pope saw as his last opportunity to get out a crucial message, a dramatic message. if i can just. i don't know how to work this. one button which doesn't seem to do anything. i'm just going to show you a couple of images to illustrate this -- yeah, that's what we are trying to do. i don't want to keep you there. this is a, shows had been so robust. this is in his last 10 days or so of his life what he looked like. if you go to the next image, you see both as younger men, at the time they both came to power in 1922, which is the beginning of my story. benito mussolini is 39-year-old. a rabble-rouser, a bully, aficionado of violence. he would come to power by leading his, kind of ragtag troops in a march on rome and through kind of extortion come to power at the end of 1922, just a few months after the pope came to power. the dictator came to depen
the rights of people of any religions race language or nationality should be the main focus of our activities. these are the base of everything i strictly controlling any shock and told to dust we will overcome any difficulties we experience the collapse of the soviet union. we were in such a condition as ukraine has now quit and think others without wages and without pensions. i spoke to people and we came out of the situation according to the president today context and like any other state should be especially careful and vigilant in the recent ankle widespread concern is no exception. due to the report of the election competing i'll collapse of the three second tier banks has extensive it since it began to withdraw money and close the deposit accounts as a result the president himself had to intervene and explain to the that there are no bankrupt banks among the domestic. with that. we should not allow any jumps which end of the most mentally providing a gradual improvement in the wealth of our people in developing national economy. recent events have shown that in the vigil which is in e
of vatileaks and the istituto per le opere di religione-- from the bank, from also some cases of corruption with the narco business, some cases of pedophilia. the credibility of the church is in terrible danger. what is necessary to do? how can we listen to the voices of the holy spirit in order to change? because everybody knew it was necessary to change many things. >> narrator: pope francis has shared that message in the most unlikely places. >> (translated): the phone rang. "i've got the pope on the line, and i really don't think we should keep him waiting." >> narrator: eugenio scalfari is the founder and editor-in-chief of la repubblicaitaly's leading newspaper on the left. he is also an atheist. >> (translated): the conversation we had started with some jokes, because that's his way. he said, "some of my advisors have warned me to be careful talking to you because you're a clever man and you'll try to convert me." me, converting the pope! >> narrator: the pope had phoned to invite scalfari for a chat. it would be a wide-ranging discussion which scalfari described in an article that
-worth. not community or religion. it is looking in the mirror in the morning. i am with that type of money. >> is that the american psyche? >> it is, but it gets emotional when the government says, you are worth less and not worth this much. be prepared for pushback. >> is compensation on three or four or five years, do people hate that? >> people ate that. but the total compensation of the executive compensation package being tied to long-term performance so your personal compensation is tied to the overall success or failure of the company for whom you work. is with us on a busy morning. we will go to provo, utah, g oogle glass. what about google fiber? changing the way that you are wired. with markets on the move, this is "bloomberg surveillance." ♪ >> good morning, everyone. "bloomberg surveillance," i am tom keene with scarlet fu and adam johnson. we are little bit better than we were at 6 a.m. this morning. robert kaplan is with us and we will talk about leadership with him. we talk about what you are really meant to do. today, it was to tie the bowtie. , the kenneth feinberg secon
. there is always some kind of aspect of religion. christianity has a big part of the story. at the same time, you have extended family. a lot of the western world has gone quite nuclear in terms of family interactions whereas we are quite extended. that story helps people. tell me about how the films are to the rest of africa. appeal, do they cross borders? >> absolutely. they will have some kind of viewing going on. the fact that you can actually sell the stuff, that is on the streets of like nairobi or johannesburg. it is anenglish, african english which is like an americanized english as well. it is something that does travel very very far. the stories are largely of africa it's. hollywood or bali wood has done this with the audiences. tell.ives a stories to >> in terms of where people watch, is not actually mostly in nigeria. it is in places with slightly better connections. thehis is the bigs of moment which is the fragile ecosystem or infrastructure on the ground in africa. were example, our largest markets in the u.s., canada, the u.k.. we have more people in london watching than in the wh
. businesses could deny service to gay customers based on religion. jan crawford is in washington with some of the backlash and new details. jan, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah and charlie. last night back out in arizona, brewer tweeted, i assure you, as always, i will do the right thing for the state of arizona. now, she's expected to make her decision no later than friday and insiders are saying it is increasingly likely that she is going to consider the right thing here to be a veto. [ chants ] >> veto! >> reporter: since the arizona legislature passed the bill last week, there have been almost daily protests. [ chants ] >> shame on you! >> reporter: it's all part of a tidal wave of opposition to the proposed state lay which would make it easier for businesses because of their religious beliefs, to deny service against gays and lesbians. supporters say the law is designed to protect religious freedom, especially for small businesses like wedding photographers and bakeries that may have religious objections to same-sex marriages. k cathi harrod helped
of religion are in the first amendment to the united states constitution. >> yes, they are. >> when should they take a state? this law in arizona you have to prove as a businessman you were being burdened in your religious exercise. it didn't give the right of people to just say, i discriminated based on my faith. you had 11 republicans and democrats, harvard law professors and others saying this has been mischaracterized. >> you didn't need the law because there is no special protection. i want to move off that point to the point you just made. substantial burden to my faith. how is it a substantial burden to your faith to take photos of a gay wedding if you are a catholic? >> i think if people say, listen, i don't want to sanction polygamy or gay marriage or anything other than traditional marriage, we need to respect that. if you don't like it, shop around. it's not hard for gays to find somebody who is going to take a picture of them is there? >> how is it a substantial burden to your catholic faith to do that? where in your faith does it say that doing that is very wrong? >> you know
the memory of her father at her drugged driving trial. will it help her avoid a conviction? >>> religion on the big screen. why hollywood is suddenly banking on the bible. but first, this is "today" on nbc. banking on the bible. but first, this is "tod >>> coming up on "trending," three parent babies, the controversial fertilization procedure. >>> we'll get the photo shop treatment on "love your selfie." eat right. not less. [ woman ] hi, this looks interesting! what's going on here? would you like to try some hot cereal? [ female announcer ] special k nourish hot cereal. special k? wow! wow! [ female announcer ] made with superfoods... superfoods sound good to me. there's quinoa, barley. i can definitely taste the quinoa. good! i can't believe that's less than 200 calories. [ female announcer ] ...to help you truly shine. this is a way to be good to me. [ female announcer ] nurturing yourself. what will you gain when you lose? [ female announcer ] nurturing yourself. in this season's most important fashion trend, the long shirt. designed to flatter, with playful hemlines and length for
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)